Podcasts

Special Episode: Measuring Internal Virtual Events

By April 14, 2021 No Comments

Special Webinar Episode: 6 Ways To Measure The Success Of Your Company's Virtual Event

With Maithili Jha from ContactMonkey

Maithili Jha ContactMonkey

Episode Summary:

While virtual events soared in popularity during the pandemic, they are hardly a fleeting trend.

From human resources and internal communications, to sales and marketing, departments across organizations have shifted their focus and resources to virtual events. The myriad benefits of online events have cemented their strategic value across various business verticals. However, no strategy can be proven successful unless it is measured.

Listen (or watch on-demand now) as we discuss 6 key success metrics for your company’s virtual event.

What you’ll learn:

  • Long-term benefits of virtual events to your business strategy
  • Key success metrics for virtual events
  • How to prove the ROI of your company event

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Episode Transcript

Maithili:

Hello, everyone, and welcome to ContactMonkey’s webinar on six ways to measure the success of your company’s virtual event. We’re super excited to be partnering with streamGo for this one. For those of you who don’t know, streamGo is a virtual event platform, which has really engaging features when it comes to in event engagement and also post event metrics. So there’s a lot for us to take away from today’s session.

Maithili:

So just to quickly introduce myself, I am a digital marketing manager at ContactMonkey and today I’m joined by Jack Ford, the Head of Marketing at streamGo.

Jack:

Hi Maithili. Thanks for the intro. Really looking forward to getting into virtual event measurement. I think it’s something where in the past year everyone’s run towards virtual events, and maybe the measurement hasn’t kind of come along with it. So yeah, excited to dig into it.

Maithili:

We’re super excited. Just going over some housekeeping. For today’s session, we’ll be going through us slides talking about the six metrics you must look at when setting up a virtual event, and then we’ll open it up for Q&A at the end. But if you have any questions as we go along, just feel free to post them in the chat box and we’ll address them at the end. We also often get the question of, will you be getting the recording after? And yes, you will. So we will be sending you the recording in your email in a day or two. Jack, I think you can take it away.

Jack:

Great. I think really, we just want to talk about the benefits of virtual events and kind of go into lots of detail here, but I think the three that we kind of tend to pick out, reach. So the fact that the audience can be much larger, don’t have to kind of break it down and do office by office. It can be kind of to everyone at the same time. There’s just really no getting away from the fact that virtual events offer that extra reach than in-person events can do. We’ve then got one called ease and that can kind of be ease of access, but also kind of ease of organization as well. I think certainly in companies I’ve worked in the past, if we’re having an all hands meeting, we’d have to pile into the canteen and inevitably there’d be someone kind of bundling by with the plates and the dishes stacked on a trolley that interrupt the keynote speaker.

Jack:

So, I think that the ease of access and the ease of organization of virtual events really brings another level of accessibility to them for internal events. And then the next one, I guess, is getting more and more important and everyone should be considering it more and more is kind of the eco impact as well. We’ve got clients who have substituted doing mini road shows and world tours with online updates and the amount of miles that it kind of cuts down on travel. There’s no need for people to be hopping on planes to visit an office in America then another one to go to Hong Kong and another one to London. So it really can really play into a lot of corporate goals at the minute, which are around making more green choices and the carbon footprint that travel has, the virtual events really cut those outs. I think it important to think about those three benefits as a whole before we get into what you can do in a virtual event or not.

Jack:

I think also just worth pointing out that what we’ve got on screen here’s a couple of quotes from some guests. We did a podcast and it was all about remote working actually, and very aptly timed last year. Both Jenny and Victoria talked about the fact that actually virtual events are a cha or a channel. I’m sure everyone out there kind of get on board with this already, but measuring the success of the virtual event doesn’t necessarily mean that the internal comms campaign or the change that you’re looking to effect has been successful. It’s a channel and it’s important to remember that it is a channel. It’s an effective one, but it’s kind of very much in isolation. It doesn’t necessarily tell the whole story of how the message has been received.

Jack:

Something to think about, we’ll dive into the metrics now and see how you can measure this impact. There’s kind of some thoughts on how it can also impact your other channels and other messages that you’re sending there, but worth keeping in mind that this isn’t necessarily going to be a fix all, but if you’re looking at doing virtual events, we’re now going to really give you the insight into how to measure if that channel has been working.

Maithili:

So going into the fourth success metric for measuring your virtual event, this is a pre event metric and like Jack mentioned your virtual events need to kind of feed into your internal communication strategy and help you achieve that goal and identifying the right events and whether these are the ones that your employees want and appreciate, it can be tricky. And one of the easiest ways to measure that is by measuring how employees respond to your event email invite. So that tells you was the topic of your event interesting to your employees? Did they find it compelling and want to learn more about the event? And that’s when emails really help because they help you measure that in a way that maybe you wouldn’t be able to use it in another platform.

Maithili:

So, ContactMonkey makes it really easy to measure the opens and clicks of your events. What you can see on the left here is using our dashboard, you can actually create an event in your outlook inbox. All you have to do is put in your event details when you create a new event, the name, the time, the location, any description that you want. And then we have a really easy to use email template builder so that’s what you see on the right. So all you have to do once you’ve created an event is drag the event content block into your email newsletter, which is either a layout that you build or you use a pre-created template. So it’s really easy to create an engaging invite.

Maithili:

And what this does is when you embed an event in your email newsletter, employees are able to RSVP to the event directly from the newsletter and add it to the calendar. So not only does this help you track event success, but it also makes it really easy for employees to engage with an event and also keep track of upcoming events. Once you’ve sent it out in the newsletter, you can measure your opens and clicks once the email has been sent out. So what the opens will tell you is, is that the subject line of your event was intriguing to employees and usually best practice when you send out an event invite is to have the topic or the name of the event in your subject line. If you see a high open rate, you know that the topic of the event is something that your employees want. If you see an open rate that’s no, maybe it’s an indicator that the kind of events that you’re hosting need to be different. And then the clicks will tell you is the actual subject matter of your email invite compelling enough for employees to register for the event.

Maithili:

So assuming that your event invite has a registration link or a button through which employees can register for the event, you will note who the clicks was the event topic engaging enough.

Maithili:

The second metric for success is tracking event registrations. This is obviously sounds really obvious. Of course you would track event registrations, but the point of this metric is there are different ways to look at that as well. So again, using ContactMonkey as I mentioned before, employees can RSVP for events through the newsletter, and this is the dashboard view that you would get to see how many people have registered for the event and you would have all their contact details. What’s really useful about this is that you can analyze which employees have engaged with the event, which departments have found it more interesting than other departments. And this kind of helps you create a more targeted event strategy going forward.

Maithili:

There’s no way to know which events are going to appeal to which employees and which departments and unless you test it out. So analyzing these RSVPs in this fashion will give you that learning so that you can refine your virtual events strategy going forward. So these are two really important metrics that you can use to start measuring your events success even before the event has taken place.

Jack:

Excess that is going to be before the event even starts. That’s a really great way to look at it and start to get a feel for how it’s working and potentially even changing some of the content you’ve got planned based on those initial metrics. That’s really interesting.

Jack:

What I’m going to start with is looking at engagement scores, and this is kind of maybe some of the hard numbers if you like of a virtual event. They’re the most common ones that people will report on as well. If we’re kind of looking at probably the most obvious one would be attendance rate. So, you want to see how many people have attended the event overall, but similar to how my Maithili just talked about, you just talked about breaking it down by department or by teams. You could do that here as well. I guess an example might be if there’s a product launch for a particular division in the company, it’s going to be really important that that sales team and the customer service teams are attending and soaking up the information, and monitoring their attendance rate is going to be pretty key.

Jack:

But, if it’s a perhaps an internal facing team in a different division, then it’s probably not vital that 100% of those people are watching the event and consuming the information live. They can access it at maybe a more suitable time. So, having to look at those different things is worthwhile.

Jack:

And then you’ve got session views as well. So number of times, a virtual event is more than just one person standing and speaking. It’s a number of events linked together over a period of time. Now, session views are going to be able to give you an experience and understanding of who’s being presented the most interesting content, which content has been overlooked and perhaps you need to do something more with that after the virtual event ends. Those session views are kind of really important to understand, yes, attendee is going to show you who’s turned up overall, but session views, okay, which content has been watched and engaged with. So, there’s a kind of a good distinction there between those two.

Jack:

And then you want to be looking at questions. So the more questions, the better. I always think it’s a good sign of engagement, the people are kind of asking questions. We’ve got a nice little extra question metric in a future slide, which goes a bit more detail. Also, poll response rate as well. If you’re looking to gather feedback or opinions on something, then making sure that enough people respond into the poll so you can come up with a decision at the end of it is kind of key. I suppose, at the moment, it’s probably lots of conversations, ongoing workplaces about how to return to the office and, if you are running a poll on a virtual event and having that discussion with people. If you’re getting a good turnout and a good attendee rate, and then a good poll response rate, you can pretty confident that the feedback and the opinions that you getting a representative of the company as a whole. If you’re getting a low rate, then the answers that you getting, you’re not really able to make an actual decision on that. So, something to bear in mind.

Jack:

And then, quite often you’re wanting to launch something and then turn on event. We’ve seen lots of things with our clients and internally here at streamGo, new resources being available especially when people have been working remotely, some kind of mental wellness resources needed to be launched and adapted. With a virtual event, you can track those clicks. You can see who is downloading. Again, it could be you want to track if it’s a certain team that are accessing this information. The virtual event platform that you use should be able to tell you number one, how many times they’ve been accessed and really, who’s been clicking through to them as well.

Jack:

That could be PDF to download, it could be links off to your resource centre that you’ve got on an intranet or something like that. But, being able to add that extra little bit of tracking in there as you’re looking to launch something or it might be an FAQ document that you need people to read. That’s another good measurement of engagement. On the streamGo platform, we a lot of this together in an engagement score, and that gets attributed to each individual attendee. And you can apply that to sessions and get an average engagement score and see which sessions have gathered the best score. You could even look at who’s the least engaged and think, okay, my follow-up campaigns, I’m going to segment and talk to those people differently. I think the engagement score is quite unique. It takes in all these things into consideration from questions and polls and making sure people are engaging with it and can really help people with followup campaigns to make those internal comms campaigns work based on who’s been engaging or who maybe needs some extra prodding to get on board.

Jack:

So that’s kind of the engagement piece. Like I say, those ones are the hard numbers if you like of a virtual event and probably the ones that are most often seen and readily available. Going to talk about now is the sentiment or the reaction, which is harder to measure, I suppose, and harder to get that information from a number and data. You couldn’t have a slide without a Disney film in there. Given this past year, I seem to have watched almost all of them with my kids.

Jack:

What we’re kind of trying to look at here really is the softer side of things is, if there’s a message that’s coming across or you’re launching something new, how is that being responded to, what reactions is that getting from your employees? Maybe in an in-person event, it’s maybe easier to see people sit forward and take attention, or maybe it’s slumped down a little bit, but online you don’t get that body language read so much. So there’s a few things that we can look at here. And there’s one which is really cool, it’s questions. And so I mentioned it earlier, but it’s not looking at the number of questions, but it’s been asking, it’s looking at what’s being asked. There’s a great company, Word Nerds and others out there who do this kind of sentiment tracking. Basically, you can take your question transcript, live chat transcript and pass it through their their tool and it’ll bring out the sentiments and the key themes.

Jack:

So, it really does the analysis and highlights what their reaction is to different things. You could put that by session. If you’re doing two, three different sessions, you can then look to analyze those sentiments and reactions by topic. Or you can do it as a whole, and it’ll kind of group those through for you. You could also then combine that with poll results as well. We’re saying it’s a little bit more complicated, but actually a poll could be as basic as finding out people’s reactions. Are they understanding the change that we’re talking about? How do they feel about the proposal they’ve just seen? You can’t get away from a poll being nice and easy, one click to give your opinion, and you’ve got that and you get a nice view about the reactions from the workforce. So, we can make things really in depth and a little bit kind of complex and sophisticated.

Jack:

Word Nerd does a great job of producing easy to understand information, but then you also have polls as well, where you can just ask outright, how do you feel about this? Are you understanding it? And you get that kind of insight straight away.

Jack:

You could also start to take cues from some of the social media sites as well. You can’t log onto a social site without seeing people liking and reacting to posts, whether that’s LinkedIn even more so these days, Facebook and the like. You could have those kinds of reactions on your virtual event session as well. Have real-time updates as people are hearing the new launch or the new growth plans, or talking about new offices or whatever it is that you’re talking to your audience about and your employees. They can react in real time. You can customise that from your thumbs up to being curious to being wanting to find out more. Hopefully not furious, but curious is a good one. I think you could do a lot worse than taking your cues from some of the biggest companies out there with their social reactions.

Jack:

And then hopefully this isn’t happening. People aren’t sleeping during the virtual event or this webinar hopefully. What this is illustrating is, being able to see when people are actually engaging with the page and it’s kind of front of their browser versus it’s playing in the background. Again, I can’t talk for every platform out there, but streamGo, we can show you the difference between who’s active and who’s engaging with the content, front of their browser, on their main screen, mouse is clicking, mouse is on the page versus someone who’s got it in a secondary tab, the audio and the video are playing away, but, they might be sifting through emails, getting their weekly shopping done or whatever it is that you can do online at the same time.

Jack:

It’s worth kind of taking a look at that because if there is a discrepancy and it’s a big one, then you suggest that they’re not engaging they’re not loving the fact, they’re not really enjoying what you’re talking about. Something that is worth kind of keeping an eye on really, and just identifying if there’s particular sessions where the drop-off is more and identify why that might be.

Jack:

And then similar to that as well is, it’s never been so easy to leave an internal company event than clicking the little red cross in the corner. You don’t have to shuffle past the row of people and open a creaky door and leave like that. You can just exit the browser and that’s it. And whilst it wouldn’t be used as a hunt out everyone who left before the end, what it does give you is a good view on which, in the most severe of cases, which sessions and which announcements have gone down so badly that people have kind of quit and exited. So, that kind of reaction and understanding piece. There are hard numbers behind it, but there’s also kind of almost the analysis of those numbers can really drive you to a result really. So I guess that’s kind of a little bit different than perhaps everything is reported on for virtual events.

Jack:

Then the next piece I guess is all around the change. During the podcast interviews that I’ve been doing over the past year, we’ve talked a lot about the fact that internal comms is usually around a change, whether that’s a change that people are wanting to make, that we all had to make last year. Whether it’s behaviour or changing locations or strategy branding, lots of internal comms campaigns are about change. I think one thing that can be easy to overlook is the change that you can actually make during the virtual event. This is another slide inspired by my children in the past year. I think I’ve read this book close to a hundred times. But it kind of illustrates the fact that change is ongoing and what we can do to draw in the event to have a look at that.

Jack:

I mentioned before about resources, there’s no point hiding away the change. If you’re looking to get people to access new things, it’s kind of providing clicks and downloads, make use of that. They’re on the webpage, they’re engaging with the content, you should be able to have those links and those documents there for people to access. It’s an easy metric to measure how many people have accessed the new policy document, how many people have read, whatever document it is or access resources. It shouldn’t have to be a follow-up campaign. You can have it there and you can report on that metric straight away. That can be one of the changes you make.

Jack:

You could have a look at poll responses, survey responses, as well as. If one of the goals is to gather opinions on pieces. Again, using a poll where people are engaging with the content in a survey response, you can tick that off for a lot of people as well. So it’s kind of those scenarios where the outcome might be that you need to gather something from someone in an action where you can do it during the virtual event. So on screen is a kind of a representation of what a round table might look like as well. So often, you’re looking to set up smaller, more intimate meetings between groups of people. It might be kind of cross-functional or cross divisional teams, working groups to have a look at, I don’t know, employee benefits or something like that.

Jack:

Again, this I guess has to be done virtually, but you can make those happen within the event. It doesn’t have to be a follow-up event. It doesn’t have to be a secondary event. You can divide up your audience and push them into these rooms where they can have these conversations where you can gather more granular feedback. You can get the more anecdotal quotes that you might need to tell a story behind something. So, again, there’s change-makers, that the change that you want to happen can happen within the virtual event.

Jack:

There’s also a good play for meetings as well to be booked. I know some places where there do know internal job fairs. They’re looking to help people move around different departments or up-skill people into different tech roles and provide that kind of career mobility within the company and not lose people to external companies.

Jack:

You could set meetings like that, your virtual event, if it’s a virtual job fair, you have presentations from the recruiter, the department lead talking about the roles and then, very easy to have a button on that page where people then can access the calendar and book a meeting slot. If you’re thinking about that job fair or that recruitment aspect of it, as you come down the metrics from people placed into new jobs, interviews had, initial meetings booked, you can see how that really layers up into that overall change that you need to make. You can start by doing it straight away in here.

Jack:

And then one thing as well is matchmaking. So for virtual events internally, a good use case of this would be a mentor scheme. So you look into maybe match-ups some junior members of staff with some more of the senior ones. And this can take a lot of legwork to do. You need to get people who want to agree on both sides. “Yes, I want to be mentored,” and “Yes, I want to be a mentor” and finding ways to match them and identifying their skills and their experience and their ambition. That can be a lot of legwork, but actually you could do a matchmaking tool with a virtual event. So kind of the animation that’s played at the minute is it an example of how you can go through the system and you can answer different questions. And at the end of it, you can get matched up with someone with either similar or different, depending on how you want your mentor scheme or whatever matchmaking scheme that you want to run works. You can match up junior and senior. You could match up people who work in marketing with people who work in brand and design. You can cross match these different skills or traits that people have and get those connections going.

Jack:

Again, you’re looking at the mental scheme as a goal overall, one of the things is going to be how many matches you’ve made. You’ve done it right there on a virtual event. There’s no need for a follow-up. So, I think there’s some in event changes that you can make and shouldn’t be afraid of having those actions within the event.

Jack:

I just want to touch on stuff like… We’ve talked about it a bit already but using the data from the event can really help make the change after. An example of this could be you could create an FAQ document or session based on the most popular questions that have been asked. We looked at Word Nerds and how that themes, topics and groups, topics, and themes together. You could really grab that information and really bring that to life in your followup documentation. You could look at the most popular sessions and now you’ve got ready-made content that you know is going to be engaging. That can be the thrust of your campaign afterwards. Similarly, there’s been some key content that’s been missed, perhaps it was the wording of the session title, the timing of it, whatever it was that didn’t get the engagement in the event, but needs to be engaged with, you’ve got pointed as to what needs to go out in different formats next.

Jack:

I guess we talked a little bit, and Maithili you started off with kind of breaking it down by departments or job titles. And, again, you can cut down the information any way you like really, depending on what you capture from the attendees and what you know about your attendees, you can break it down and see, is there a particular management level that hasn’t been engaging or is there someone, job function, that’s kind of really shown a lot of interest in one piece that you can benefit from that? Similarly, you’ve talked about change makers and people that have been making those in event changes and clicking downloads to resource. You’ve got two audiences there. You’ve got people who have done what you want them to do, and you have got people who haven’t done that. So you’ve got two different campaigns that you can go to people. You can maybe learn from people why they did do it, and you can take that and apply that in future campaigns to those who haven’t done it yet.

Jack:

So, I feel like the data and the metrics and the success of a virtual event, don’t just stop when a virtual event finishes. You can take all the information that it holds and play it out until your campaigns and your different channels and even your strategy for a long time to come. Which I think probably leads nicely on to your side Maithili.

Maithili:

That’s so comprehensive the things that Jack shared, are there any ways to get event feedback and metrics that you don’t usually get through your average event platform, and there’s so much value to that. And then the six metrics that I’m going to talk about is gathering employee feedback in a very quick and easy way. We feedback we often get from internal communicators is that they are just always challenged with measuring the effectiveness of their internal communications and that applies to emails or any other form of communication including events. So how do you truly know that it worked and how do you know that it had the effect you wanted to have on employee sentiment or employee engagement? The best measure of that is obviously employee feedback itself. But the reason why that’s such a big challenge is because employees are not motivated to give that feedback and that’s for several reasons.

Maithili:

It may be that they just don’t have the patience to do it. They get kind of overwhelmed with what they’re working on during the day, and they don’t want to sit and invest in giving you feedback. Another reason might be is that they just don’t feel confident or comfortable sharing that feedback because they don’t want to be judged for it, or they just don’t feel like it’s their place to give very candid feedback.

Maithili:

So another way to gather that feedback on your event is to ContactMonkey’s email template builder, once again. So we have some engagement features that are focused on gathering anonymous, candid employee feedback, and that’ll help you kind of overcome those feedback barriers. So a way to do it as embedding pulse surveys or reading skills or anonymous feedback inside your newsletters, it’s as easy as it was to embed your event in the newsletter. Similarly, you just drag and drop a block into your newsletter for feedback.

Maithili:

So what you can see on the right is an example of a star rating scale. So you can just simply embed a question in your newsletter or saying, how do you feel about the upcoming event, or how was your event experience that took place last week? And they can literally in a second give you feedback by picking a star rating. And then below is how you would see those results. You’d be able to see the percentage of responses you’ve got for each of those ratings. You’d even be able to get a score. And then you’re able to enable anonymous comments in case employees wanted to give any qualitative feedback. That’s also a way in which you can keep it anonymous.

Maithili:

And like Jack mentioned, everyone is really accustomed to social media and giving likes or using emojis to express how they feel. And it’s really intuitive for everybody now that most people engage with these things on social media. And you can see through Instagram, how popular polls are. People like giving feedback when it’s quick and easy. So these star ratings can be customised to be emojis as well and you can experiment with what your employees respond to the best. But there is no better measure than to hear it from the horse’s mouth. So these are just really simple and quick ways to gather feedback post your event.

Maithili:

So with that, we’ve kind of covered the six key metrics right from pre event, during event to post event. And we hope you find those valuable and we can open it up for Q&A. So if you have any questions to send them into the chat box and we will be addressing them now.

Jack:

I’ve got some come through already. This one actually just come straight through. Based on the feedback service, how soon after would you send the survey?

Maithili:

I would say the best time to send the survey would be right after the event and latest maybe a day after the event, when it’s top of mind, employees have just engaged with it. They’re more compelled to give you the feedback. People do want to share that as well. So when it’s top of mind, the sooner, the better. Not beyond a day later I would say.

Jack:

I’d agree with that. Soon the better works well. I’ve got one here as well which while you’re getting them all Maithili. Can you view acceptances or RSVPs I suppose by department in ContactMonkey?

Maithili:

Yeah. So as I shared before, you get a dashboard view of all your RSVPs. You can see each person that’s registered and you can download that registration report, and then you will get a big department and title wise so you can filter department wise to highlight or identify which departments are more interested in it or not. It’s a really great way for you to target your communication better and cater events to the right audience.

Jack:

Great. I can see someone’s asked about if we’ll have a download or on demand version. Yes. I think you might’ve missed the the housekeeping at the start, but yeah, we’ve got an on demand version that Maithili you’ve be coordinating. This one is talking about for a virtual event, what kind of format recommendations we’ve got for kind of what’s the most engaging? I mean, video always does really well. There’s so many stats out there that show that video is the number one engaging format. I’m not necessarily going to put all my weight behind that. I feel like it can depend on what the goal needs to be. If you’ve got an action to take or a click to take, then we’ve discussed different ways what that can look like. It could be that, it’s information slides, a short presentation, but having those links to actually click.

Jack:

I know it’s maybe not the exact answer you’re looking for, but making it nice and obvious for people to actually do the action. If the content format can match that, that’s how you’re going to drive the engagement. But, if you’re talking in slides via video, I think it depends on the message. If it’s something quite technical that people need to take away, slides might be good. If it’s a bigger story and you’re looking to introduce something, then nothing really beats the impact of video I’d say.

Jack:

I’m just going through some questions here. I’m not sure we’re going to get through to all of them, but any that we don’t get through to we’ll come back to via email, dish out between ourselves as to who we think would do it. So this one talks about kind of reusing content from the events. We talked about how you can use the data, but it’d be interesting to maybe talk about how you could reuse the content from it as well.

Jack:

I’ll have a little stab at answering this first. Maithili, you can kind of jump in if there’s anything you want to add, but I suppose what we’ve seen people do is, take little short snippets of the videos that can be played out on the internet. We talked about question and answers, the most popular questions forming a Q&A session. If your analysis of the question data really picks a topic that someone identify as a theme that people just aren’t quite grasping, that’s kind of a new Q&A session that you could either have as an internal blog or a follow-up campaign. Don’t know if you’ve got anything to add to that, Maithili about how people could reuse their content afterwards.

Maithili:

Yeah. With all live events, it’s a great idea to kind of update your website with them. Because, after you’ve reached the audience that registered, you can continue to reaching new audiences that may be interested in that topic. And then, like Jack mentioned, it’s a great way, another great way is to summarise the content in the form of a blog for people who prefer consuming it that way. And then if it’s an internal company event, you just want to use it to drive employee engagement. If it’s a shared experience that your employees have had, it might be nice to kind of summarise the experience in an email that you send out to everybody, maybe those who missed it have screenshots of the event just to kind of continue the engagement post event. That could be an idea too.

Jack:

Yeah, definitely. I guess when we missed the one that we’re going to be using, we are sending the on-demand footage out as well. So yeah, definitely do that. So I think probably maybe time for one more, and I say, we’ll come back to the other ones on email, just conscious of time that we’ve taken up. This one looks like it’s probably for yourself, Maithili is, can you manage registrations of multiple events at the same time?

Maithili:

Yeah. You can. Like I’d shown earlier on the slide, if you create one event, you can create multiple of them. You would however, have to embed one event at a time. You could have multiple events embedded in a newsletter. For example, if you’re going to be sending out an invite for all the upcoming events in a particular month. You can embed them one by one into a newsletter, and then you’ll be able to track RSVP simultaneously of each event to even compare maybe this topic is more exciting or maybe this date and this time works better for events. So it’s a great way to kind of compare different event strategies and get that holistic look on what it should be going forward.

Jack:

Great. Okay. That’s good. I can see a few more in there, but I think looking at the time probably best to come back to those on email so we can let people get on. Thanks for having me on Maithili. It’s been great.

Maithili:

Of course. And just before we leave, if any of you are interested in finding out more about how you can manage your events from your inbox, definitely book a demo with us using this link. I will include it in our follow up email as well so you will have access to this link. And, we know how busy an internal communications calendar can get, especially if you’re planning multiple events throughout the year or even different content strategies throughout the year. So for you to kind of simplify a process and plan it out, we’ve built out this really useful internal comms planning calendar, which we’ve got really good feedback from, so you can download this free resource. Again, I will include it in the follow-up email.

Maithili:

Thank you everybody for joining us and thank you so much, Jack, for co-hosting with me. This was a really great informative session and see you all next time.

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Jack Ford

Author Jack Ford

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