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Episode 2: Jenni Field

By May 21, 2020 No Comments

Are You Remotely Interested?
Remote Control Episode 2

With Jenni Field

This episode takes a close look at research conducted by Jenni: Remotely Interested, to discover why non-desk based workers are one of the biggest barriers to effective internal communication.

In this episode we discuss:

💡 The sanctity of the “Third Space”

💡 The role of Line Managers¬† for communication

💡 Why notice boards aren’t going away anytime soon

Remote Control - Jenni Field

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Episode Transcript

Jack:

With me today on the Remote Control podcast is Jenni Field. Jenni is the director of Redefining Communications and co-founder of IC Crowd. Jenni, you’re also about to become the president of the CIPR, so really glad you could squeeze this in.

Jenni:

Thank you very much for having me. It’s very nice to be here.

Jack:

So when I was researching for this podcast, it became very quickly apparent that I should speak to you. So lots of people pointed me in your direction in terms of being an engaging personality and a real expert, but I also came across the research that you did with SocialOptic all around remote working and internal communications. So yeah, I just thought it’d be a perfect fit to get you on the Remote Control podcast.

Jenni:

Sounds like it, yeah. No, definitely an area that we’ve been looking at in the last year to really try and get over the issue that people have with communicating with a remote or a deskless workforce.

Jack:

So that’s a really good point there you just kind of mentioned, remote or deskless. I think that’d be a great point to start off with, just clarifying maybe the definition of remote workers for this research.

Jenni:

So the research came about on the back of the Gatehouse State of the Sector research, which is a report done by Gatehouse, which is a Gallagher company. They do that every year where they report on internal communications and every year we see fairly similar things. Last year, 2018, it was communicating with remote workers. So to help move that forward, the research came out of really trying to understand why this continued to be a barrier for internal communicators. We specifically looked at the workers that were cafe workers, train drivers, people working in the fire service, so those people that work for organisations where they aren’t at a PC, they aren’t at a desk and their job is completely remote and distant from the centre and often from their managers as well. So it’s a growing challenge. I think, as a society, we’re seeing more and more people in those sorts of roles, so it was designed to really try and spend time with those individuals, talk to them and find out a little bit more about why it was such a challenge for internal communication teams.

Jack:

Perfect. Yeah. I think you mentioned the growth in those roles and I’m just thinking maybe things like the gig economy is also contributing to that fact, where you’ve got a lot of people working for maybe an umbrella brand, but have no physical location and no need for a physical location. Things like Uber Deliveroo, those kinds of people, I guess.

Jenni:

Yeah, definitely. I think it’s also tying in with people’s expectations of organizations today. We could link it into social purpose and lots of broader themes and topics that come up around organizational culture and how we work today, which is just very, very different. Even if I think about the people that work in hospitality, when I was younger, going out for dinner was a treat, it wasn’t something that you did necessarily all the time, but nowadays people are eating out so much more, the number of restaurants and coffee shops that we see on the high street has probably tripled in the last 10 years. So I just think that with society changing, people eating out more and all those things, we’re just seeing a very big shift in the types of businesses and organizations that exist today.

Jack:

Yeah. That’s a really good point. You can’t move for a coffee shop these days. And for someone who doesn’t drink coffee, that’s kind of limited appeal, but there’s some great hot chocolates around. So that suits me.

Jenni:

Exactly. And always a croissant. You can always go and get a croissant if nothing else.

Jack:

Yeah. That’s my Achilles heel, a pain au chocolat and you’ve got me. So in the research, I guess there’s two definitions of a remote worker. There’s solitary and team, so it’d be great to go straight into that part and understand maybe some of their kind of key differences that your research highlighted for those two differences.

Jenni:

Yeah. So we have solitary, team and we also identified mixed, but the core two are solitary and team. So what we found when we were talking to people was that the task that they were doing and the way they worked with other people in the organisation linked to the types of conversations they could have and the communication that they needed. So when we were doing the research, it’s important to say that we did this with SocialOptics’ platform and it was all done on an iPad. So it was kind of five minutes, people could go to quite quickly and answer the questions, but we did it face to face with them. So the results that we’ve got are a mixture of that data capture, but also the conversations that we were having. It was really when you look at both the data capture and the conversations that we started to draw out this piece around the different types of remote worker.

Jenni:

So your solitary worker would be your bus driver, essentially. So they don’t need anybody else to do their job, the task, the driving of the bus, they do that completely on their own. They’re not reliant on anybody else really to do that. Then you’ve got team. Now team, for me, is quite an overused word in organisations, but that’s a slightly different topic. But for me, a team is a team in the truest sense, so you are reliant on each other to deliver the task. So this is where we’re looking at the fire service, for example, that is a true example of a team where you’ve got different skills coming together.

Jenni:

Then you’ve got mixed, which just sits somewhere in the middle. This, for me, was the people that work in hospitality, those kinds of spaces. So whilst I may be responsible as the waitress in that environment to take the food from the kitchen to serve the customer, I don’t rely on anyone else to do that task, but I do rely on the kitchen to make sure that the food is to the standard and that it’s to the quality that the customer would expect, so it’s somewhat mixed. With those three different types comes just a slightly different interaction with each other. So if you think about the solitary, when we were with the bus drivers, for example, their time when they’re together is completely social. Their conversations aren’t really about work. Whereas when you’re looking at someone that’s mixed, most of their conversations are linked to the task they’re doing and the interactions that they’re trying to complete in order to serve the customer. The types of content that they’re sharing with each other, their time for communication varies quite dramatically depending on the type of remote worker that they are.

Jack:

I hadn’t really considered that kind of element of the internal communications, the kind of colleague-to-colleague social interaction. I’d only really ever thought about maybe the more intentional communications from maybe the C-level execs or the internal comms department to the employees. That’s really interesting, that kind of communication and the purpose of it really changes depending on how you’re performing your task or who you’re performing a task with. That’s really fascinating.

Jenni:

Yeah. It was something that really surprised us. I think, as we go through the research and one of the things that we talked about a lot when we presented it has been around the micro environment that these guys work in. I think it’s easy for us as internal communicators to think about, to your point, that intentional communication from the centre out and also getting some of that back. But actually their worlds are very, very local, hyper local and more local than, I think, we probably give it credit for. That’s the piece that we really have to understand and respect as well, that it’s not just about the bigger organisation to them.

Jack:

So in terms of those micro environments then, would that be physical spaces? Does that present opportunities and maybe limitations for companies to use those hyper micro environments for the official company communications?

Jenni:

Yeah, definitely. When I think back to when I was head of internal communications for a company called SSP, they do the food and drink in train stations and airports around the world, I was looking at how we’d communicate with maybe 80% remote deskless workforce. If you think about the units or the stores that you’d go to in a train station, they’re very small, so the office space that exists for them is equally very small. We might think in the centre that we’ll send a poster out or do something linked to a new crisis line or something like that, but actually their wall space and their whole space is very small and they want to use that space to talk to each other as a team and do things that are way more local. And way more, to some degree, more important, their rotas and handovers and those things.

Jenni:

So it’s just really thinking about the environment that they’re in, what the reality is of how they want to use that space and giving them the autonomy to use that space how they want to use it as well. We certainly saw themes of the lack of autonomy that comes with being this sort of remote worker is really quite a challenge because they have a task to do, they’re quite prescriptive in how they do that task. So if you take away any other part of autonomy, you’re telling them where to put posters on the walls or how to do this, then they don’t have huge levels of motivation, which is something to also consider.

Jack:

Yeah. One thing that came up from when I was going through the research, it struck me that notice boards were still really one of the key channels, I guess, and one of the ones that were preferred, if that’s not too strong a word, by some of the different types of remote workers. I guess perhaps it’s the roles that I’ve been in that have become more and more to almost solely digital based in terms of the communications. That kind of really, yeah, that was unexpected, I guess, for me.

Jenni:

Yeah. I think this links to the theme around third space, which we uncovered in the research, which is where … what we see is, where you’ve got digital screens, and when we talk about when we present it and we ask people, “Have you got digital screens in your organisation?” A few hands will go up and then we’ll say, “Do those screens work?” And most people say, “Absolutely not.” What we’ve seen is those screens being switched off or turned off. We’ve had stories of PlayStations being plugged in and all sorts of things, anecdotally, which is always interesting to hear. But the reasons why that doesn’t work is because a digital screen is much more intrusive and that’s why noticeboards are much more preferred, because it’s my choice to go over and read that noticeboard, whereas a digital screen is much more in your face, it’s much louder, it’s more disruptive to your break time.

Jenni:

The third space piece comes in, which is a phrase coined by Ray Oldenburg, who’s a sociologist. Starbucks use this in their brand and their marketing material. So if you think about going to a Starbucks, they encourage that is your third space, so it’s a space distinct of being at work and being at home and it’s that space where you’re with friends and you’re socialising, you’re building community. What we tend to do with internal communicators is we’ll put digital screens into the third space inside organisations, so the mess rooms, the canteens, because that’s where everybody sits together, but what we’re doing is we’re going into their third space. So for them, that space is not where they do their job.

Jenni:

The bus drivers, they do their job driving the bus, so by putting a screen in there we’re just really intruding in less space. I can put a noticeboard in there and that will go down much better because it’s their choice to go and read it, it’s not going to disrupt them from having their conversations. And it’s that autonomy piece again, it’s giving them that freedom to choose whether or not they want to go and read that information.

Jack:

Yeah. That’s really interesting. A part of me wonders if a noticeboard versus a digital screen, maybe if someone’s expecting a screen up there it’s like, oh, well I could be watching the telly on that instead of watching the communications and so on. It’s almost like, well, you’ve shown me that we can get the digital screen up there, but now you’re forcing something on me that I’m not really wanting to watch. In my head I can think that it could be used for something more social and more pleasurable for me, the individual.

Jenni:

Yeah, definitely. I mean there are places where the screens do work, so there’s definitely some places where we’ve seen that the screens worked very well. We can talk about channels and channel choice and that a bit later on, but I think if you’re not having much success with the screen, it will be down to the third space element, so have a look at switching it out to a noticeboard and looking at doing those really, really well.

Jack:

Yeah. That’s a good point and, I guess, a great segue to talk about channels. One thing that really struck me, both of this research and some other information that I’ve seen in conversations that I’ve had is around the role of line managers. So the internal comms messages is coming from, say, the internal comms department and a lot of it is very dependent on how a line manager can communicate that and respond to questions. I’m just wondering what the use of line managers for remote work is, because it’s like another channel compared to the usual office based approach.

Jenni:

Yeah. I think the piece about line managers for me would work both in terms of this research specifically about remote workers, but I’d also look at line managers in the broader working environment, because line managers come up again and again as one of the biggest blockers or barriers to successful communication. What we found in the research was that the line manager and whether or not your manager is a good communicator tracks across everything else that you’re doing.

Jenni:

So what we’ve traditionally thought is your line manager is very important when it comes to communication and engaging the workforce, but they are kind of standalone as a channel. What this research tells us is that, if you have a print magazine and an intranet and a noticeboard and you’re managing those centrally from internal communications teams, even if you’re doing those amazingly well, if the line manager isn’t a good communicator, they will bring down every other channel. It completely tracks across all the other questions and we can see that the core link being the skills of that line manager and their communication skills. It’s so important because they will be the one to say, “Oh, I won’t give out the magazine,” or, “I won’t put this on the noticeboard,” or whatever it might be, but they have a huge link to the success of any other channel that’s being used.

Jack:

And do you feel that this, or have you seen that the right kind of training or programs in place to help new line managers, or to help managers that are transitioning into a remote team, is that something that’s been taken on board by companies? Or is that something that’s kind of been highlighted by the report as a challenge that’s kind of not quite there, or been taken care of yet?

Jenni:

Yeah. I think, for me, the training around communication inside organisations is really not very good at all. I’ve been doing some training on it, which I wasn’t expecting to do on the back of this research, where people have said, “Can you come and run some sessions on how to have impactful communication?” Which is great, because actually for me, the core to our success as internal communicators is helping managers, leaders be better communicators and I think that goes across the board. I don’t think we are good at helping managers who are maybe very skilled at the task develop their management skills. I haven’t seen a huge amount of success around that and I think it’s one of our biggest failings.

Jenni:

I remember hearing a communications director talk about the fact that they kind of linked communications functions to a finance function and it’s the best analogy I’ve heard. He said when you’re a new manager, you will probably go to the finance department and you will probably spend time with them to understand the reports you’re going to get, how to manage your budget, how to manage your P and L. Whatever it might be, you’d go to finance for that sort of kick-off discussion. You’re then give the tools and everything to do that. You might go back to finance every now and then to double check something, or just to go over some detailed stuff, but essentially you’re given everything you need to go and do the job. That doesn’t happen with communication functions. Nobody goes to the communications team for a, talk to me about how to be a better communicator with my team and give me the tools to go and do that and then I’m going to come back to you as and when I need you. We haven’t got to that maturity level yet as a communications function, certainly not in the masses.

Jenni:

I’m sure there are pockets of it, but it’s not the norm that your communications function would be offering that level of service. And that, for me, is where I really want us to get to as a profession, an industry, whatever you want to call it. If there’s a line manager or an operations manager, he’s leading a team across an area so we’ve got vast numbers of direct reports, plus then people working for them, that they would come to the communications function, not just because they want to do a campaign on wellbeing or because they want to launch a new newsletter, but because they want to look at their skills as a manager and how they communicate and engage.

Jack:

Yeah, that’s a really good point. It’s not something for a specific campaign, but it’s to make their job easier, better. The impact on their reportees is also going to be really profound if they can start making the information they’re talking about more relevant and easier to understand. So I wonder if, on the flip side of that, whether there’s kind of some more work that companies can do during the onboarding stage for employees. It’s almost been a bit of a training, coaching perhaps on the different channels that the company uses for internal communications. I can think of different places I’ve worked where it’s very much the person I end up sitting next to who’s been here longer than I have kind of saying, “Oh, you need to go to this to check out this,” and, “Have you set up this?” It’s not necessarily been part of the formal welcome to your role, it’s been training and onboarding. I wonder if that’s just my experience, or if that’s reflective across many people.

Jenni:

Yeah, I think so. I mean I used to go to the induction when we had new managers joining and I’d talk about our IBM connections platform and our magazine and the fact that we did an annual conference and all those things. So I’d spend time talking to them about how we communicate as an organisation. That was really important to me. Induction is once a month, so half an hour once a month for me to go and talk to new managers about how things work around here and how we communicate is really important. I think that’s starting to become more normal. I think the difficulty is that we are still very focused on the channels and how does that work, rather than how do you need to communicate as a manager? I think they’re two quite different things and I just don’t think we’re quite there yet in being able to say we’ve been working with learning and development and this is now the workshop that we run on impactful communications, or how to have difficult conversations. I just don’t know that’s as normal as it could be.

Jack:

Yeah. So there’s still quite some work to do in there. It feels like it kind of ties into the part of the research that looks at the relevance. I feel like the relevance of messages being passed into the employees did differ slightly than maybe the accuracy. It would be good to get your take on the differences and some of the similarities between that bit.

Jenni:

Yeah. So the relevancy stuff’s really interesting. Whenever we talk about this, Benjamin always really nicely articulates where the relevance piece really plays in. It’s linked to the noise that we hear a lot about. People will often say, “There’s so much noise in here. I get so many emails with so much noise.” What we saw in the research is that you don’t differentiate between noise and relevance. So if I send you 10 emails that are all about a different site, or they are linked to different people, or they’re not specific for your job, you would say, “Oh, there’s so much noise in this organisation. I get so many emails.” If I send you 10 emails that are very specific to you to allow you to do the job, to feel connected to your team, to be relevant to the role that you play in the organisation, you would say, “Actually no, it’s fine. Actually everything I received is relevant to have what I need to do my job. I don’t feel like we’ve got too much noise.” So we don’t link noise and relevance.

Jenni:

So those 10 emails, the important piece there is how relevant is that content to that individual. And from a central perspective, quite often, we go for relevance in a very broad sense. So we’ll say, right, well this is about that site or that location. It needs to be way more relevant than that. That links back to the data that we have to hand internally, which is often not quite as good as we want it to be, but the relevance piece came out as being equally as important as the line manager skills for me and I think something we underestimate hugely.

Jack:

Yeah. Something you just mentioned there in terms of the data not always being as deep or as insightful as needed, one of the themes that’s come out of this podcast series has been around measurement of internal communications. I’m very aware that’s not a two minute answer or anything of the sort, but it’d be great to get your take on what things need to maybe be looked at differently for the measurement. So one thing that came previously was that all the internal communications emails were sent via Outlook. Quite an easy change would be to use a traditional marketing system where you could have a look at exactly who it’s being sent to, delivered, bounced, opened and clicked. It’d just be good to get your thoughts on some of those types of measurement techniques, or where we think we could go with that.

Jenni:

Yeah. I mean measurements are a big topic. The CIPR internal comms group Inside, as I was leaving as chair, we did a piece of research in partnership with the Institute of Internal Comms on measurement of internal communications. It was led by Trudy Lewis and Helen Deverell was involved from the CIPR Inside committee with Suzanne Peck from the IoIC. We looked at what already existed in terms of measuring internal comms and then what the gaps were. For me, there’s some fundamental things to think about.

Jenni:

The example you just gave there of changing an email provider to one that allows you to measure is fine. I mean for me, how many people have clicked on something, how people have opened something is one way of measuring. And another way of measuring would be, if you’ve asked me as your internal communications team to help you do a campaign because we need to reduce our accidents from 50% to 20%, then my measure is whether we produced accidents with 50% to 20%. It’s not how many people have read that poster or how many people have heard that message. It has to be linked to the behaviour change that you’re trying to influence.

Jenni:

To measure effectively your objectives have to be sound and, quite often, if I’m looking at award entries or anything like that, it’s the objectives where we’re falling down. We’re not being clear enough of what we’re really trying to achieve. The measurement side of it is such a big word. I blogged about this the other day. Measurement is different things. Often I’ll show pictures of somebody having their blood pressure taken, or somebody measuring up a window, or somebody using measuring spoons to cook. They’re all measurements, but they’re doing very different things and I think we have to get way more granular in what we’re looking at around measurement in order to have success in our organisation.

Jenni:

What we found in that research that we did with CIPR Inside, and there’s a report that is available for people to read the exact summary and if you’re a member you can download the whole thing, but the biggest thing for me, when I was looking at what exists today, all the models, all the stuff we were reading all linked back to the Barcelona Principles. There’s eight of those. You can go and find those in the report and also on the AMEC website, but they all really linked back to that. If you can take those principles, tweak them, apply them to your organisation, then that’s really where you need to start from. That and getting your objectives nailed is the most important.

Jack:

Yeah, that’s a really interesting take on it. I feel like that mirrors some of the conversations I’ve had around which technologies or tools to use. It’s kind of like, well that’s the wrong way round of looking at it, it should be what’s the objective or what’s the message and that would then dictate which channels could be used and then which channels are used could be different again. I think we’ve all worked somewhere where there’s an intranet being updated by someone who must go home and cry because no-one’s reading the posts, despite that being the official channel. Talking about measurement and the different ways of looking at it, the objectives, they should be the overall end goal of a campaign, whether that’s external communications, internal communications.

Jack:

One thing that someone I know has done before, they analysed the words or the common words in questions after an all hands or a town hall event. People submit questions either before or after and it’s analysing, their topics that have been covered, have they been understood with the questions that have been submitted afterwards? I thought that was quite a good way of doing it, because you can’t actually put a number on that and it’s not something that’s quick and easy to do. But certainly, from their point of view, if they’re looking to change either a behaviour or process but then the questions were still coming about the old process, that was quite a clear indication to them that they had work still to do on that message.

Jenni:

Yeah. I think you’ve hit the nail on the head there around it’s not just about one form of measurement. So we talk about survey fatigue, we talk about doing poll surveys and employee engagement surveys. I’ve just done a load of listening interviews where I sit one-to-one with people and ask them the same sort of questions, but having that really human time, if you like, with somebody and having a conversation about how they feel about work and their challenges, you can really drill into the language that they’re using, the way they’re saying it, their body, all the things that go with communication that allow you to really understand. I can’t put a metric on those. I can’t say 67% of people said that they felt safe at work, but I can draw the themes out of that. That’s my experience and my judgment and that’s what you’re looking for from a communication professional. What’s the right measurement for us to achieve what we want to achieve? And then how do you apply that to then fixing it and solving the issue that you’ve got?

Jack:

You make it sound so easy.

Jenni:

Well I’ve been doing it for 15 years, that’s all.

Jack:

It would be good to talk about a bit of maybe a summary of some of the opportunities. So we’ve talked a lot about maybe some of the difficulties or challenges that the research highlighted in terms of making sure the relevance is there and it’s not invading their third space, but it’d be really interesting to see what opportunities you picked out from the research for companies to take on board with these types of remote workers.

Jenni:

Yeah. I think there’s lots of opportunities. I think we’re still seeing an increase, but it’s a very slow and steady increase, in the strategies that people have in internal communication. What we found when we did the research, because we did it for free for organizations, they got their own report so that they got something for helping us do it. We went and spoke to heads of internal comms or internal comms managers with the data specific to their organisation. That allowed us to really get underneath what we were seeing and just verify that what we were seeing was accurate. Where there was a process, a structure, a strategy, it was much easier for them to do personalised content and relevant content for the employee. So there’s a huge opportunity, I think, to just take the time to do the strategy and do some of that thinking and using data driven insights to do that. It’d be great to see an increase in that and the opportunity that brings, just to make your life easier, really, as a team.

Jenni:

I think the other opportunities for me are really around people. So I talk a lot about the importance of people in organisations and remembering that we need social connection. We need relationships as the human species. I think spending time with people to help them understand that is such a huge opportunity. If we don’t start to invest in our line managers or in people and their communication skills, we can invest all we want in digital channels and digital screens or whatever we want to invest in, we’re not going to make any difference if we don’t help people communicate more effectively. So that’s the biggest opportunity for me, now is the time for us to really look at how do I make a difference by coming back to some of the real fundamentals of what it is to be a manager and lead a team?

Jack:

Yeah. That’s really interesting. It’s not being distracted by the shiny new digital tool out there which can promise to reach 99% of the audience and guarantee X percent of engagement, it’s actually do the managers, do the employees have those interpersonal skills to make sure that those messages can be conveyed and understood easily?

Jenni:

Yeah. And I think when you’re working remotely, I’ve known a lot of people that work in the airline industry and they’ll often say, “We’re just a number.” Or I’ll hear a case study at a conference with the internal comms team talking about how they’ve transformed this organisation through various digital channels and then I’ll go and talk to people that I know work at that organisation and they’ll say, “I’ve got no idea what you’re talking about.” I think it’s getting a bit of a reality check of actually, the work that some of these guys are doing when they’re remote are incredibly remote. Even if they are working in telecommunications or anything like that, they could be on their own. They might be doing shift work where they don’t see their manager. They might be communicated to completely digitally, so they get information on their phone that tells them where they need to go next or when their break is and they don’t talk to somebody in a line manager or in a team capacity because their team is so fluid.

Jenni:

I think there’s so much more to explore in some of the industries that have remote teams and what that really means. I think just taking time to really think about that, think about their day, think about how they work, will really start to shift some of the things that we think are the right solutions from a digital perspective.

Jack:

Yeah, no, I can’t agree more. I think coming from maybe an external communications point of view, which is kind of where I work, I think it’s the same type of thing. You can see companies that have got lost in trying to own a channel that’d be most effective and they’ve forgotten the need to craft that message and craft that story for people at the end of the day. I know it’s maybe on your social media advertising, or it’s accounts and all numbers on the screen, but yeah, in reality, it’s John at home who you’re talking to and you need to make sure that you have got that message just right for him.

Jack:

So the podcast is called Remote Control. I feel like this last question is kind of slowly being discovered for what it is and it’s to fill up my Netflix list. I just felt that I couldn’t really do a podcast called Remote Control and not ask for some telly recommendations. So Jenni, are you watching anything that you could recommend? There’s no judgment. Well, not at least while we’re recording anyway.

Jenni:

Gosh, quite a lot. I’m trying not to watch as much as probably I have been, but my husband and I are both big fans of Netflix and Amazon Prime. So from a Netflix perspective I’m a big fan of Queer Eye, because that’s nice light relief. I recently watched Unbelievable, which is a short series of crime drama which was really good.

Jack:

No spoilers. I haven’t seen that.

Jenni:

No, no spoilers. And then Amazon Prime, we watched The Boys, which I don’t know if you’ve come across, which is a dark side of superheroes. Brilliant. Really good.

Jack:

Yeah. I really like that alternative take on the superheroes. A bit gruesome, it’d probably come with some kind of guidance rating there on this podcast.

Jenni:

Yeah. Yeah, definitely. There’s some good stuff across those. We started watching something last night with Paul Rudd and I can’t think what it’s called now, but that’s on Netflix. Learning To Live With Yourself or something like that. My husband finds all sorts and that looks really interesting. The first episode certainly got me interested to watch a few more, so that would be on the list too.

Jack:

Oh, perfect. I’ll check that one out as well. Well just before we go Jenni, we spoke a lot about the Remotely Interested research. Do you just want to let people know where they can find that?

Jenni:

Yeah, sure. So the report is totally free. You can go to RemotelyInterested.work and there’s a summary on there and you can download the report as well. We are giving you the option when you download it, if you want to have us come in and run a session with some of your teams about the research. So what we’ve found is that a few people have said, “Oh, I’d love you to come and talk to my leadership team about why this is so important,” and we’re happy to come in and do that if it’s helpful as well. So there’s options on there, but you can get in touch with me on Twitter, I’m @MrsJenniField if there’s anything that you want to talk about specifically. The more we can share this research and the more we can help internal comms people use it to have those conversations in the workplace, then the better.

Jack:

Perfect. Well yeah, the only thing left for me to do is to say thank you. Really appreciate you coming on and giving us so much insight from the research. It’s been really interesting.

Jenni:

Great. Thank you very much for having me.

Jack:

No problem.

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Jack Ford

Author Jack Ford

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